Sculpting Digital Cultural Heritage

Methods for capturing, analysing and digitally displaying cultural heritage

Convenor: Lisandra (Lia) Costiner

Hashtags: #3Dheritage #DHOxSS20

Computers: Please bring a laptop (no tablets please) where you have admin privileges, and a smartphone with its cable

Abstract

This strand introduces methods for recording, analysing and displaying cultural heritage (sites, material and visual culture). This includes the digital capture of objects, the creation of 3D models, and the employment of these models in interactive immersive experiences (augmented reality smartphone applications and virtual reality environments).

Intended outcomes

Through a series of hands-on sessions, participants will explore techniques for recording, analysing and displaying cultural heritage. This includes the digital capture of objects and the creation of 3D models using Photogrammetry and Sketch-up. In subsequent sessions, participants will use the models created as a basis for designing interactive immersive experiences. These comprise the creation of augmented reality smartphone applications and virtual reality enviroments for the display, exploration, and research of cultural herigage sites and objects. Intereactive sessions will be complemented by guest lectures from experts in the field and visits to local Oxford museums to explore the intefration of these tools into the museum experience.

Experience necessary

No prior technical knowledge is necessary for this course.

 

Computer and software requirements

 

Please bring a laptop (no tablets please) where you have admin privileges, and a smartphone with its cable

Convenor

Lisandra (Lia) Costiner is a Junior Research Fellow in the History of Art at Merton College, Oxford, and leads the Oxford TORCH Network (en)coding Heritage. She earned a DPhil (PhD) from the University of Oxford and held a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the laboratories of Digital Humanities and Experimental Museology at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. Lia is a medieval art historian who is interested in digital techniques for the preservation and research of material and visual culture.

 

TIMETABLE

 
Monday, 13th July 
08:00-09:00
Registration (Sloane Robinson building)
Tea and coffee (ARCO building)
09:00-10:00

Opening Keynote (O'Reilly lecture theatre)
10:00-10:30

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
10:30-12:00

Introduction to Digital Cultural Heritage

​Workshop description TBC

Speaker:  Lia Costiner

12:00-13:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)
13:30-15:30

Workshop title TBC

​Workshop description TBC

Speaker: TBC  

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
16:00-17:00

Workshop title TBC

​Workshop description TBC

Speaker: TBC  

.
Tuesday, 14th July

 

09:00-10:30

3D-Modelling the Past: Photogrammetry as a Tool for the Documentation of Cultural Heritage 
 

​This talk will present a brief overview of photogrammetry, including a history of the technology and the basic principles of structure from motion. The talk will then explore the uses of photogrammetry in cultural heritage, focusing in particular on archaeology and digital epigraphy.

 
Speaker: Ellen Jones

10:30-11:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
11:00-13:00

 

A Practical Introduction to Photogrammetry

 

This workshop will provide a step-by-step introduction to using the photogrammetry software Agisoft Photoscan. The workshop will start with a practical photography session before moving on to using photographs to create 3D-models and orthophotographs.

Speaker: Ellen Jones
13:00-14:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)

 

14:30-15:30

A Practical Introduction to Photogrammetry (continued)

In this session we will continue working with our photogrammetry data to create a mesh and to add texture to the model.

Speaker: Ellen Jones

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
16:00-17:00

Additional sessions (various venues)

Wednesday, 15th July
 
09:00-10:30

Virtual Rome: a digital model of the ancient city

 

In this lecture, Prof Matthew Nicholls describes how he created a large scale 3D model of Ancient Rome, and some of its uses in teaching, research, outreach, and ‘impact’.

Speaker:  Matthew Nicholls

10:30-11:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
11:00-13:00

Introduction to Digital Modelling in SketchUp

 

This is an introduction to the intuitive and accessible 3D modelling software SketchUp. The aim is for participants with no previous experience of 3D work to get to grips with the software’s fundamental principles and toolset, and undertake various simple 3D modelling tasks.

Speaker:  Matthew Nicholls

13:00-14:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30

Introduction to Digital Modelling in SketchUp (continued)

 

In this session we will continue working with SketchUp on 3D modelling tasks.

Speaker:  Matthew Nicholls

15.30-16.00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
16:00-17:00

Additional sessions (various venues)

 

Thursday, 16th July 
 
09:00-10:30

Virtual Reality Experiences for Engaging with Cultural Heritage

Workshop description TBC

Speaker: TBC  

10.30-11.00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
11:00-13:00

A practical introduction to creating Virtual Reality Applications in Unity

Workshop description TBC

Speaker: TBC 

13:00-14:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30

A practical introduction to creating Virtual Reality Applications in Unity (continued)

 

Workshop description TBC

Speaker: TBC 

15.30-16.00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
16:00-17:00

Additional sessions (various venues)

 

Friday, 17th July
 
09:00-10:30

 

Holographic AIs and other adventures in Augmented Reality

Workshop description TBC

Speaker: Fridolin Wild
10:30-11:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
11:00-13:00

 

A practical introduction to creating Augumented Reality Applications

 

Workshop description TBC

Speaker: TBC 

13:00-14:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30

Kick-start your own project workshop and discussion

Workshop description TBC

Speaker: Lia Costiner

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)

16:00-17:00

Closing Keynote (O'Reilly lecture theatre)
Speaker biographies

 

Ellen Jones is a final year DPhil (PhD) student in Egyptology at the University of Oxford, focusing on the representation of the family in ancient Egyptian tomb iconography. She has worked with two epigraphic missions in Egypt, the Oxford Elkab-Hagr Edfu mission and the Karnak Graffiti Project, which document, record, and analyse ancient inscriptions at these sites. Her primary areas of expertise include archaeological photography and photogrammetry, including the creation of 3D-models and orthophotographs, and digital epigraphy.

Matthew Nicholls is Senior Tutor at St John’s College, Oxford where he continues to work on digital visualisation and reconstruction. He previously held a lectureship and then a chair in Classics at the University of Reading. There he developed a large scale 3D model of ancient Rome, which he has used extensively in teaching, research, outreach, and commercial work, winning several national awards for teaching and innovation. His model was used as the basis for a popular free online course (or ‘MOOC’, on the FutureLearn platform) on ancient Rome, which has so far attracted over 40,000 learners from around the world.

Fridolin Wild is a Senior Research Fellow, leading the Performance Augmentation Lab (PAL) of Oxford Brookes University. His research seeks to close the dissociative gap between abstract knowledge and its practical application. He focuses on radically new forms of linking directly from knowing something ‘in principle’ to applying that knowledge ‘in practice’ and speeding its integration into polished performance.

 
 
 
 
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