Linked Data for Digital Humanities

“Publishing, querying, and linking on the Semantic Web”

Convenor: Dr Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller

Lead Trainers: John Pybus, Graham Klyne

Hashtag: #LD4DH and #DHOxSS2019

Computers: Please bring your own laptop (no tablets please)

Abstract

 

Introducing the concepts and technologies behind Linked Data and the Semantic Web. Learn to publish research so that it is available in these forms for reuse by other humanities scholars, and how to access and manipulate Linked Data resources provided by others.

Participants will be introduced to the underlying theoretical concept that underpin the Linked Data information publication and representation paradigm. This provides a solid foundation for the practical, hands-on components, where participants are introduced to a selection of possible tools. Participants will complete the whole RDF-production workflow, starting with tabular data, and culminating in uploading the RDF they have produced into a triplestore. Participants will then write SPARQL queries to retrieve and edit this RDF. Each day also includes a talk by a visiting speaker, providing insights into different projects, the methods and solutions applied in them. 

Experience necessary

No prior technical knowledge necessary

Advanced Reading List:

1) https://programminghistorian.org/en/lessons/intro-to-linked-data

2) https://programminghistorian.org/en/lessons/graph-databases-and-SPARQL

3) http://linkeddata.org/guides-and-tutorials

Please install the following software on your machine prior to the Summer School:

 

If you have trouble installing this software on your machine, please contact us prior to the workshop.

Convenor

Dr Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller is a lecturer in Digital Humanities at the Centre for Digital Humanities Research at the Australian National University. Her research involves the use of Linked Data and semantic web technologies to support and diversify scholarship across a range of topics in the Digital Humanities.

She says, "Our aim for LD4DH is to equip our learners with a theoretical understanding, some hands-on experience, and a set of methods and resources for future investigation and learning.  The week is an intense experience, tailored specifically to an interdisciplinary audience and taught by people who have, like the participants, come from a humanities background, or otherwise worked extensively on Digital Humanities projects.

 

The Summer School is a wonderful place to teach because it gives me the chance to talk all week long about a specific niche in the digital humanities that I’m very passionate about. I think the Summer School is an amazing, really in many ways unique, opportunity for members of the digital humanities global community to get together. The workshops promote a sense of camaraderie and community with people which goes beyond the experience of trying to network at a conference "

"The workshop was inspiring and challenging (in the best way). Terhi, John, and Graham were so generous with their time and knowledge."

DHOxSS 2018 participant

TIMETABLE

 
 
The Linked Data workshop will be held in one of the Sloane Robinson seminar rooms.
 
Link to overview of the week's timetable including evening events.
 
Monday 22nd July
08:00-09:00
Registration (Sloane Robinson building)
Tea and coffee (ARCO building)
09:00-10:00

Opening Keynote (Sloane Robinson lecture theatre)
10:00-10:30

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
10:30-12:00

Introduction to #LD4DH workshop at DHOxSS
 

​This session is an introduction to the Linked Data workshop. It includes introductions, and an overview of the course. This is an opportunityt for the participants to outline their aims for the workshop as well. We will discuss the practical requirements of setting up, completing, and mainintaining a Linked Data project, and compare Linked Data to other alternatives such as relational databases and XML.

Speakers: Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, John Pybus, Graham Klyne

 

12:00-13:30

 
LUNCH (Dining Hall)

13:30-15:30

Introduction to Linked Data - theories and practice

​This session is an overview of the RDF data model, and the most theory-heavy session of the week. We will discuss jargon, acronyms, the triple datamodel, and look at examples of knowledge graphs. We will discuss how the components of instance level RDF, ontologies, SPARQL queries, and triplestores all form part of a cohesive workflow.

Speakers: Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, John Pybus, Graham Klyne

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
 
16:00-17:00

Sharing the wealth, Linking Discipline: Linked Open Data for numismatics 

​This talk by Andrew Meadows (University of Oxford) will describe the creation and progress of Nomisma.org, a namespace and ontology for numismatic concepts.  It will also introduce some of the exciting new tools that are being built within the world of numismatic Linked Open Data.

Tuesday 23rd July
09:00-10:30

 

Ontologies - in theory

 

In this session, we discuss the purpose and functionality of ontologies, and look at some well-known examples of ontologies used in Digital Humanities projects and the GLAM sector. Participants will begin to develop an ontological structure of their own in groups, capturing the knowledge within a given sample dataset, or a dataset of their own (if applicable).

Speakers: Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, John Pybus, Graham Klyne

10:30-11:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
11:00-13:00

Ontology - in practice

 

In this session, participants will finalise their ontological design, implement it in Protege, demonstrate their model to the rest of the group, and export it as .TTL in preparation for tomorrow's activitites.

Speakers: Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, John Pybus, Graham Klyne

13:00-14:30

 
LUNCH (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30

Linked Data for Digital Musicology

This talk will introduce applications of Linked Data to Digital Musicology, illustrated through four case studies. The first shows how RDF can help structure the complexity of a complete live annotation of Wagner's Ring, while the second addresses the challenges and benefits of linking and reconciling independent resources describing Early Music. Our third project uses SPARQL to combine metadata and computational audio analyses of the Internet Archive Live Music Archive, while our final example uses Linked Data annotations to realise a contemporary classical composition and performance. 

 

Speaker: Kevin Page

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
16:00-17:00
 
Lectures (various venues)
Wednesday 24th July
09:00 -10:30

RDF production

In this session, particpants will be introduced to Web-Karma, which they will use to produce RDF based on the ontology they designed and implemented the day before. They will also have a chance to edit and finalise their ontology.

Speakers: Daniel Bangert, Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, John Pybus, Graham Klyne

10:30-11:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
11:00-13:00

RDF production

In this session, particpants will use Web-Karma to completing their RDF-production workflow and upload their triples into Blazegraph.

Speakers: Daniel Bangert, Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, John Pybus, Graham Klyne

13:00-14:30

 
LUNCH (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30

In this session, Stephen Downie will provide an insight into projects that combine Linked Data methodologies and technologies with data from Digital Libraries.
Speaker: Stephen Downie
15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
16:00-17:00
 
Lectures (various venues)
Thursday 25th July
09:00-10:30

SPARQL - in theory & in practice

Speaker: Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, John Pybus, Graham Klyne

10:30-11:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
11:00-13:00
Linked Open Geodata with Recogito
This session, run by Valeria Vitale (University of London) will show the use of Recogito, an online tool developed by Pelagios Commons, to annotate named entities and, in particular, to georesolve place references in text, images and tabular data. The participants will be walked step by step through the creation of semantic annotations: from the choice of the sources, to the use of automatic recognition; from disambiguation to the different options to visualise, download and further process the data produced.

13:00-14:30

 
LUNCH (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30

Paula Granados García will be presenting on the progress in her work during since she attended the #LD4DH workshop at DHOxSS. Her research deploys Linked Open Data technologies to overcome the impediments regarding data processability, accessibility and interoperability in archaeological scholarship with the aim to investigate the question of Cultural Contact in Early Roman Ulterior Baetica from 3rd ct. BCE to 1st ct. AD. With this aim, she has created the Early Roman Ulterior Baetica dataset (ERUB), a dataset of almost 3 million RDF triples integrated by data gathered online from LOD databases such as Pleaides, Nomisma.org and EDH and a whole set of new triples generated ex novo based on a subset of data collected from Spanish institutional catalogues and secondary scholarship using python scripts. She has also developed the Cultural Contact Ontology (CuCoO), which defines the main concepts related to cross-cultural interaction in antiquity, and explores different ways of perceiving and modelling cultural contact phenomena.

Speaker: Paula Granados García

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
16:00-17:00
 
Lectures (various venues)

Friday 26th July

09:00-10:30

The Gap between Digital and Humanities: Issues for the Semantic Web (theory)

If we want to use digital in the humanities beyond providing simple references then we need to understand and negotiate a new relationship with technology. This introductory session talks to the issue of how the humanities can take a more active role in the design of digital systems, particularly using the Semantic Web and Linked Data, so that they reflect the complex needs of subject experts, rather than conform to the ‘essence’ of technology.

Speakers: Dominic Oldman, Diana Tanase

 

10:30-11:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)
11:00-13:00
The Human Curated Knowledge Graph (practice)
In this session we will construct, as a group, a Semantic Web knowledge base starting from an empty canvas and using a visual knowledge mapping tool. We will produce a functional and contextually rich Linked Data informational structure that is visual and highly accessible, that can be shared, searched, and can be used to enrich the Web of Data. For further information see https://www.researchspace.org/dhoxss.html

Speakers: Dominic Oldman, Diana Tanase

13:00-14:30

 
LUNCH (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30
Final workshop session

 

The final session of the workshop is a talk by Dr Athanasios Velios. This session will look into the principles behind modelling with CIDOC-CRM and its use in integrating heritage collection data. Examples from Oxford collections will be presented (Bodleian conservation and Ashmolean conservation). The potential benefits of large-scale reasoning and inference will be discussed in relation to knowledge progression and argument making.

Speaker: Athanasios Velios

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO Building)

16:00-17:00
Closing plenary (Sloane Robinson lecture theatre)
​Tutor biographies:

 

Andrew Meadows  is a Professor in Ancient History, Faculty of Classics, and Tutorial Fellow at New College. He is editor of the American Journal of Numismatics, a past-editor of Coin Hoards, Co-director of the Online Coins of the Roman Empire project and currently the international Director of the Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum project. He is also the co-founder of the nomisma.org namespace, and is particularly interested in the application of Linked Open Data approaches to the publication of all forms of evidence for the ancient world.​​

John Pybus works at the University of Oxford's e-Research Centre where he has been part of many projects building technology to support research in the Humanities, with a particular interest in the application of semantic web technologies.

Graham Klyne studied applied maths, and worked for many years as a commercial software developer, leading to engagement with Internet and Web standards creation. He was involved in early Semantic Web standardization, including as co-editor of the first RDF Concepts and Abstract Syntax specification. For the past decade or so, he has been a researcher at Oxford University, working with subject specialists on applications of Linked Data on the Web, including bioinformatic image annotation, research data management, classical art objects, workflow and process descriptions, digital music, and historical places.  He is also developing an open source tool, Annalist, to make it easier for researchers to experiment with linked data designs, and to create linked data on the web.

Kevin Page is a senior researcher at the University of Oxford e-Research Centre, where he applies Linked Data to the Digital Humanities through several research projects. He is PI of the AHRC 'Unlocking Musicology' project and a Co-I of 'Digital Delius', 'Mapping Manuscript Migrations', and 'Workset Creation for Scholarly Analysis'. As Technical Director of Oxford Linked Open Data (OXLOD) he works with collections across the Gardens, Libraries, and Museums of the University, and has participated in W3C activities including the Linked Data Platform (LDP) working group. From 2012-15 he convened the Linked Data workshop at DHOxSS, where he now runs the Digital Musicology course.

 

Daniel Bangert is a librarian and musicologist. He is currently a Scientific Manager at the Göttingen State and University Library, working on European projects related to open science, including the Research Data Alliance Europe. His research interests include research data management, scholarly communication and digital musicology.

Paula Granados Garcia is a PhD student at the Open University looking at Cultural Contact in Early Roman Spain Through Linked Open Data Technologies. She has collaborated with the Sunoikisis Digital Classics online programme where she designed and taught a class on Geographic Semantic Annotation and visualisation and has taken part in several trainings and workshops on the incorporation of Digital tools for the study of the Ancient World.

Valeria Vitale is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Classical Studies (University of London). Her research focuses on the use of Linked Open Data to enhance transparency in academic research and, in particular, 3D visualisation of ancient heritage. She has also worked on several projects about digital ancient geography and is currently part of the Pelagios Commons team.

Dominic Oldman is Head and Principal Investigator of the ResearchSpace project at the British Museum, and a Senior Curator in the department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan. He is an interdisciplinary researcher with a background in cultural heritage information systems and produced the Museum's first collection online system and Semantic data interface. He has researched and developed Semantic Web applications and their underlying theoretical frameworks for the last 7 years. He is co-deputy chair of the CIDOC CRM Special Interest Group and is currently a DPhil student at the University of Oxford, History Department.

Diana Tanase is a computer scientist and a Senior Curator at the British Museum working on the development of the ResearchSpace platform. Her research expertise is situated in the domain of artificial intelligence in particular knowledge representation of expert domains. She has previously taught at the School of Design, Royal College of Art (2005-2017) and University of Westminster (2004-2012) running workshops and courses that ranged from mathematics fundamentals, programming, to Social and Semantic Web languages and technologies. Some of her other projects include development work on the The Webby Award winner Computational Science Education Reference Desk and a number of web-based collaborative tools for teaching.

Athanasios Velios works at the University of Oxford's e-Research Centre as OxLOD Data Architect, developing a workflow for data integration across the collections in Oxford. He was trained as a conservator and has worked in the field of museum documentation with particular interest in conservation documentation for the last 15 years. He was part of the St. Catherine's Library conservation project, led the development of the Language of Bindings Thesaurus and was the webmaster of the International Institute for Conservation from 2009 until 2017.

Stephen Downie is the Associate Dean for Research and Professor at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He is also the Illinois Co-Director of the HathiTrust Research Centre.

 
 
 
 
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