An Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative

From source to publication

Convenors: Huw Jones, Yasmin Faghihi, Matthew Holford

Hashtag: #TEI and #DHOxSS20

Computers: Please bring your own laptop (no tablets please). 

Abstract


This workshop combines taught and practical sessions with case-studies introducing the use of the Guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), with a focus on the representation and publication of primary sources. As TEI is a very broad and flexible standard we will focus on how TEI can best be used in specific research contexts. We will showcase a number of projects in the fields of digital editing, text-analysis and publication. Case studies will cover both specific textual phenomena and those common to diverse media and genres. Core aspects of TEI to be covered in the hands-on exercise sessions include structural elements of texts, metadata, representing people, places, dates and groups, the transcription and description of documents, encoding correspondence, and how to query, transform and publish your texts.

Intended outcomes

Participants will leave with a practical grounding in what the TEI can do to represent both the physical and the textual features of sources, how it can inform the analysis of texts, and how it can form part of a publication pathway.

 

Experience necessary

No previous experience with markup, XML, TEI, or editing is assumed.

Computer and software requirements

Please bring your own laptop (no tablets please).

 

Advance reading list
 

Lou Burnard, What is the Text Encoding Initiative? How to add intelligent markup to digital resources. Marseille: OpenEdition Press, 2014. Available on the Internet: http://books.openedition.org/oep/426. ISBN: 9782821834606. DOI: 10.4000/books.oep.426.


Convenors

Huw Jones is Head of the Digital Library Unit and Digital Humanities Coordinator at Cambridge University Library, working with researchers, curators, and technical staff to make the Library's special collections accessible online. He has supported and collaborated with a wide range of TEI projects from descriptive catalogues such as the Cambridge Digital Library and Fihrist to digital edtions such as the Newton Project and Darwin Correspondence Project. He has taught TEI in Cambridge University as part of the Cambridge Digital Humanities learning programme. 

Yasmin Faghihi is Head of the Near and Middle Eastern Department at Cambridge University Library and Chair of the FIHRIST Board of Directors (on-line union catalogue for manuscripts from the Islamicate world). She has been involved in collaborative work to create standardised practices for manuscript description in TEI. Yasmin teaches targeted use of TEI to new contributors to FIHRIST and coordinates workflow activities for the catalogue. She has been a major contributor to Cambridge Digital Library and taught TEI at workshops in Manchester, Oxford and as part of the Digital Humanities Programme in Cambridge.

 

Matthew Holford is Tolkien Curator of Medieval Manuscripts at the Bodleian Library, Oxford. He joined the Bodleian in 2014 and has worked extensively on the TEI catalogue of Medieval Manuscripts in Oxford Libraries. Previously he was senior researcher on a TEI digital edition of medieval documents, Mapping the Medieval Countryside. He has taught on the TEI strand at DHOxSS since 2015.

"[The convenors] provided expert and generous instruction. They were always patient and happy to answer our many questions. They arranged a wonderful group of guest speakers: I found it invaluable to learn about these different projects and from practitioners that included both developers and scholars."

DHOxSS 2019 participant

TIMETABLE

 
Monday, 13th July
Introduction to markup and the TEI 
 
08:00-09:00

Registration (Sloane Robinson building)
Tea and coffee (ARCO building)
09:00-10:00

Opening Keynote (O'Reilly lecture theatre)

10:00-10:30

Refreshment break (ARCO building)

10:30-12:00

"What is TEI and why you might want to use it the principles of XML, markup and TEI and how they relate to research questions"

The principles of XML, markup and TEI and how they relate to research questions.

Speakers: Yasmin Faghihi, Matthew Holford and Huw Jones

12:00-13:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)
13:30-15:30

Exercise: Creating and editing TEI documents. The basics of TEI files using the Oxygen XML editor
The basics of TEI files using the Oxygen XML editor.

Speakers: Yasmin Faghihi, Matthew Holford and Huw Jones

15:30-16:00

 

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
16:00-17:00

Primary source documents and encoding issues (Weston Library)

We will take a look at some primary source documents from the Bodleian collections. This session will take place in the Bahari Room at the Weston Library. Please assemble at the ARCO Building by 15.50 where Yasmin or Huw will meet you to take you to the Weston Library.

Tuesday, 14th July
Using TEI markup
09:00-10:30
 
What to mark up and why?
What are the options for TEI markup - and how to decide what markup to use.

Speakers: Yasmin Faghihi, Matthew Holford and Huw Jones

10:30-11:00
 
Refreshment break (ARCO building)

 

11:00-13:00
Exercise: A practical guide to TEI mark-up
Hands on exercises and examples of TEI markup.

Speakers: Yasmin Faghihi, Matthew Holford and Huw Jones

13:00-14:30
Lunch (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30
Case study: Taylor Editions

Digital Editions in Medieval and Modern Languages

 

Speaker: Emma Huber

15:30-16:00
Refreshment break (ARCO building)

 

16:00 - 17:00
 
Additional sessions (various venues)
Wednesday, 15th July
Encoding primary sources - manuscripts

09:00-10:30  
Describing and transcribing manuscripts using TEI
Using the msDesc module to encode manuscript descriptions

 

Speakers: Yasmin Faghihi, Matthew Holford and Huw Jones

10:30 -11:00
 
Refreshment break (ARCO building)
11:00-13:00

Exercise: Encoding manuscripts
Practical exercises based on real life manuscripts

Speakers: Yasmin Faghihi, Matthew Holford and Huw Jones

13:00-14:30
Lunch (Dining Hall)
14:30 - 15:30  

 

Case Study: Using TEI manuscript data to answer research questions

Speaker: Luca Guariento

15:30-16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)
16:00-17:00

 

Additional sessions (various venues)

Thursday, 16th July

Encoding primary sources - correspondence

 

09:00-10:30
Describing and transcribing letters using TEI
Using the correspDesc module to encode correspondence

Speaker: Elizabeth Smith

 

10:30-11:00
 
Refreshment break (ARCO building)

11:00-13:00

Exercise: Encoding correspondence

Practical examples and exercises of encoding letters with the correspDesc module.

Speaker: Elizabeth Smith

13:00-14:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)
14:30 - 15:30
Case study: The Darwin Correspondence Project

Speaker: Elizabeth Smith, Darwin Correspondence Project

15:30-16:00
Refreshment break (ARCO building)

 

16:00-17:00
 
Lectures (various venues)

Friday, 17th July

Publishing TEI

09:00-10:30
Transforming TEI with XSLT with XPath and XSLT
Using XPath and XSLT to transform and analyse single TEI documents or sets of TEI data  
Speaker: Mike Hawkins

10:30-11:00
 
Refreshment break (ARCO building)
11:00-13:00
Exercise: XPath and XSLT
Some basic applications of XPath and XSLT for TEI
Speaker: Mike Hawkins
 
13:00-14:30

Lunch (Dining Hall)
14:30-15:30

Case study: The Newton Project

Speaker: Mike Hawkins

15:30 -16:00

Refreshment break (ARCO building)

16:00-17:00
 
Closing keynote (O'Reilly lecture theatre)
Speaker biographies

Emma Huber is Subject Librarian for German, has worked for several large digitisation projects. Her most recent role, before switching careers to academic librarianship, was for the European IMPACT (Improving Access to Text) Project, disseminating best practice in digitisation with partner institutions including the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the British Library, the Bibliothèque Nationale de France and Biblioteca Nacional de España. She now combines her expertise in Digital Humanities with her library role, offering training, advice and research opportunities. She has founded the consultancy Huber Digital to offer the same opportunities to researchers outside Oxford.

Luca Guariento started his working career as a Systems Administrator in a software house. After three years he resigned and enrolled at the University of Bologna, where he received a BA in Drama, Art and Music Studies, and a MA in Musicology. He then moved to Glasgow, where he completed a PhD in Music, researching on the seventeenth-century polymath Robert Fludd. In the meantime, he got increasingly involved in many Digital Humanities projects, specialising in XML technologies and the TEI standards, IIIF, and maps. He is now Research Systems Developer at Glasgow University, where he combines his grounding in the Arts and Humanities with his passion for digital humanities tools and methodologies

Elizabeth Smith is the Associate Editor for Digital Development at the Darwin Correspondence Project, where she contributed to the conversion of the Project’s work into TEI several years ago, and has since been collaborating with the technical director in refining the Project’s use of TEI. She is one of the co-ordinators of Epsilon, a TEI-based portal for nineteenth-century science letters.

Mike Hawkins is the Technical Director for numerous digital humanities projects, including the Darwin Correspondence Project, the Newton Project and Enlightening Science (both at the University of Oxford), Livingstone Online (Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL) and the British Living Standards Project (University of Sussex). He was also the Project Manager of Windows on Genius (University of Sussex, Cambridge University Library). Hawkins is also the Technical Director of The Casebooks Project (History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge), The Cambridge Platonists Project (Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge) and the Wordsworth Project (University of Cambridge & Newcastle, Cambridge University Library).

 
 
 
 
 
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